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Trees Of the Bloedel Reserve Trees of the Bloedel Reserve
1992 - $2.00 (donation)
32 page booklet - black & white illustrations

A few of the 50 trees featured are:

Red Alder (Alnus rubra)
Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides)
Cascara (Rhamnus Purshiana)
Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica)
Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata)
English Elm (Ulmus procera)
Empress Tree (Paulownia tomentosa)
Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii)
Grand Fir (Abies grandis)
Korean Fir (Abies koreana)
Katsura (Cercidiphyllum japonicum and C. magnificum)
Mountain Hemlock (Tsuga Mertensiana)
Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla)
Portugal Laurel (Prunus lusitanica)
Madrona (Arbutus Menziesii)
Bigleaf Magnolia (Magnolia macrophylla)
Dawson Magnolia (Magnolia Dawsoniana)

    Trees of about three hundred kinds grow at the Bloedel Reserve. They span the range of treedom, from maples of centurial stature, dripping with mosses and ferns, to the slender, shrub-like angelica trees luxuriating in the understory. You can vividly feel the importance of trees by simply imagining them gone. The bleak and bare result is a shockingly different scene, one of raw desolation. But the trees are here. As with millions of other acres in the maritime Pacific Northwest, the trees enjoy a generous climate and an adequate soil. It is, however, the artfully planted beautiful foreign species fringing the native woodlands, that have made the Bloedel Reserve a unique combination of natural and human creative forces; an ever-evolving work of art whose changes in the seasons are marked mostly by the trees.
    So Japanese maples glow against the deep green firs of the West Coast, and English yew trees enclose a pool that reflects images of Washington natives. This thoughtful blending of the best exotic species planted tastefully in a lowland Washington forest, enriches the native beauty like a turquoise set in leather. Lovers of our native woods, please don't be offended at the comparison -- because of this area's untold millennia of volcanic, glacial past, our present forests are dark, subdued and low in diversity. Although beautiful and moving nonetheless, for us to enliven or "spice" the drab acres of alders and close-packed ranks of swarthy firs, is to give ourselves still greater pleasure.


Copies can be acquired from:
The Arbor Fund - The Bloedel Reserve
7571 NE Dolphin Drive
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
www.arborfund.com



Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert

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